Welcome

Immigrantinfo.org’s mission is to support a healthy and resilient community for everyone through successful integration of immigrants, refugees and asylees into our society. Our intention is to create a collaborative space that facilitates connection, cooperation and focus on our common goals. We invite the submission of information about news, classes, resources, and community events of interest to Santa Clara County immigrants.

The continuing challenge of COVID-19 will be influencing our activities for some time. Programs continue to evolve in accordance with guidance from the Department of Health, changing needs and resources. We are trying to keep up with the simultaneous program changes of hundreds of resource links and this is made possible by the assistance of the community.  Please notify us of your events, ESL and Citizenship classes listed, and program changes, so that we can keep the information current.

We will continue to post important news and information on our COVID-19 page focusing attention on identifying and developing needed resources for those who will be most vulnerable in this pandemic. Please also share information about any resources or events that would be of benefit to the community or decision makers. Contact us at: Administrator@Immigrantinfo.org

Announcements

In the News

DISASTER - PG&E power shutoffs could become more frequent
3/23/21 SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge overseeing Pacific Gas & Electric’s criminal probation said Tuesday that he is considering requiring the utility to be more aggressive about turning off its electricity lines near tall trees, a plan that could double the number of power outages for some Northern California counties over the next decade. The proposal outlined during a two-hour court hearing is the latest effort to prevent the utility’s equipment from sparking more deadly wildfires by reducing the likelihood that trees could fall into the utility’s long-neglected electrical equipment. U.S. District Judge William Alsup is overseeing PG&E’s safety precautions as part of the utility’s criminal probation after its natural gas lines blew up a suburban neighborhood south of San Francisco in 2010.
HEALTH - New Stanford research: Why Zoom can wipe you out
2/23/21 COVID-19 pandemic has moved our lives into a virtual space. Why is that so exhausting? The tiredness doesn’t feel earned. We’re not flying an airplane, teaching toddlers or rescuing people trapped in burning buildings. Still, by the end of the day, the feeling is so universal that it has its own name: Zoom Fatigue. Stanford researchers find four causes for ‘Zoom fatigue’ and propose simple fixes
HEALTH - What you can and can’t do after getting fully vaccinated against COVID-19
3/8/21 People who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can resume some parts of their old life but must remain vigilant in many ways as the pandemic continues, according to new federal guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Key Words: Pandemic, Coronavirus
HEALTH - Your Bay Area guide to (legitimately) score a COVID vaccine — even if you’re not ‘eligible’ yet
3/13/21 In the coming weeks, millions more people will become eligible — including people with certain disabilities and health problems starting Monday. But even then, most Californians will be waiting — perhaps all the way until the May 1 deadline for full eligibility President Biden set on Thursday. Some enterprising Californians who aren’t eligible for a coronavirus vaccine yet — we’re looking at you, relatively healthy 16-to-64 year olds — are finding ways to get them anyway. And they’re not lying about being health care workers or dressing up as senior citizens to do it. Key Words: Pandemic, Coronavirus
HOUSING - What Santa Clara County renters, landlords should know about evictions
3/16/21 Renters affected by the pandemic likely took a sigh of relief when, early this year, California lawmakers extended the statewide ban on evictions for those facing financial hardships until the end of June. The law also created a rental assistance program to help lift lower-income renters out of rental debt. The program started taking applications this week. The application does not ask for or require proof of citizenship. List of Organizations Helping Renters with Applications Key Words: Undocumented
IMMIGRANTS - Biden admin to end Trump policy that let DHS deport caregivers for migrant children
3/12/21 The Biden administration said Friday it will end a Trump-era policy that let U.S. border agents collect information about the immigration status of people who came forward to care for unaccompanied migrant children so it could potentially deport them. The policy, which began in 2018, allowed the Department of Homeland Security to identify and deport those would-be caregivers who were in the country illegally. It meant that immigrant parents who came to the U.S. and then later sent for their children to cross the border faced possible deportation when they tried to pick up their children from Health and Human Services custody.
IMMIGRANTS - How Joe Biden’s immigration plan works, and what it would mean for California
President Joe Biden on his first day in office sent Congress an extensive immigration proposal that could have big implications for California, which is home to the largest undocumented immigrant population in the nation. The plan, known as the U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021, would provide a pathway to citizenship to the 11 million unauthorized immigrants living in the United States. About 2 million of them live in California.
LEGAL - Public Charge Update: What Advocates Need to Know Now
3-9-21 The Government informed the Supreme Court that it will no longer defend the public charge rule issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) under the Trump Administration. DHS announced that it would restore the public charge policy described in the 1999 field guidance, essentially returning the Public Charge rule to it's pre-Trump form. This live document will be updated by Protecting Immigrant Families.
NEWS - Amid anti-Asian violence, San Jose’s Vietnamese residents embrace COVID-19 vaccines
4/2/21 Despite a fear of anti-Asian violence hanging over their heads, some Vietnamese residents lined up as early as 4 a.m. to get a COVID-19 vaccine at a new mobile clinic this week — a chance to defend themselves against a virus that’s disproportionately infecting them. “We initially expected around 700 people but now there’s about 1,000,” said Asian American Center of Santa Clara County CEO MyLinh Pham. She organized a mass vaccination event in the heart of the city’s Vietnamese community within the span of a few days after getting 475 doses – but had to find a few hundred more after running out in the early afternoon.
NEWS - Asian Americans face attacks during pandemic
3/15/21 Stop AAPI Hate began tracking violence and harassment against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders on March 19 last year. From then through the end of 2020, Stop AAPI Hate received a total of 3,292 complaints from all 50 states and Washington, DC, according to a Stop AAPI Hate news release. The coalition, which had previously reported a lower number of complaints for 2020, said some incidents that took place in 2020 were not reported until earlier this year.
NEWS - California’s reopening plan includes no equity benchmarks for hard-hit communities
4/11/21 California began a 10-week countdown to a full reopening last week, with Gov. Gavin Newsom’s bold proposal to lift nearly all coronavirus restrictions by June 15. But the ambitious plan contains no specific protections for vulnerable populations, sparking fears the state is about to repeat mistakes that devastated the Latino community last year. The omission was surprising, considering that Newsom’s announcement was triggered by the delivery of 4 million vaccine doses to disadvantaged neighborhoods, a key goal that the state had set to address inequalities in the state’s inoculation efforts. In recent weeks, Newsom and other state officials have referred to equity as the “north star” of the pandemic response.
NEWS - How the Bay Area failed Latino residents during the COVID crisis
3/14/21 Case rates for Latino residents are nearly four times higher than for White residents, analysis shows. Why? Public health leaders’ centerpiece strategy, the nation’s first and strictest stay-at-home orders instituted one year ago, proved ill-suited for a population whose members often live in crowded housing and have no alternative to working outside the home. And local and state governments were slow to muster the focus and resources that might have made a real difference, even as community advocates pleaded for more action. Key Words: Pandemic, Coronavirus
NEWS - Oakland clinic offers Mayan interpreter for COVID-19 vaccinations
3/19/21 This month, La Clinica de La Raza began offering the community-targeted vaccination service at 32 locations across the Bay Area, including ASCEND Elementary School on East 12th Street, where Latinos who speak Mam, K’iche ‘and Q’eqchi’ can get translation help from appointment to inoculation on Thursdays. There are over 22 different Mam dialects spoken primarily by people of Guatemalan and Mexican descent. According to a recent UC San Francisco study, Mayan people with Guatemalan roots are the fastest-growing ethnic group in Oakland.
NEWS - San Jose scrambles to respond to attacks on elderly Asian Americans
2/20/21 San Jose lawmakers took steps this week to deter hate crimes and protect would-be victims after a string of seemingly xenophobic attacks targeting Asian American elders around the Bay Area hit close to home just before Lunar New Year. .... The committee unanimously approved Peralez’s plan, which directs city leaders to host community listening sessions, plan safety workshops and partner with the District Attorney’s Office on efforts to address hate crimes.
NEWS - San Jose’s Japantown to form community patrols amid surge in anti-Asian violence
3/20/21 a highly visible community patrol over the historic district in the wake of escalating anti-Asian violence in the Bay Area and across the country. Retired San Jose police veteran Rich Saito, who is still working as a reserve officer, is spearheading the effort modeled after a similar protective initiative in San Francisco launched near the start of the pandemic a year ago. “We have to do something to protect people, especially the seniors, in Japantown,” Saito said in an interview Saturday.
NEWS - Santa Clara County To Launch Mobile COVID Vaccination Unit After Receiving $200K Donation
3/29/21 SCC officials and the chief executive of San Jose-based Bloom Energy on Monday announced a $199,000 donation to the Valley Medical Center Foundation to cover the purchase cost of a mobile COVID-19 vaccine unit. The vaccination unit will target residents who are homebound, elderly and disabled as well as residents that live in the county’s underserved areas that have been hardest hit by the pandemic. Key Words: Disaster
NEWS - Their East San Jose neighbors were dying. So frustrated community leaders formed their own COVID task force
3/14/21 Magdalena Carrasco’s frustration was boiling over. More than a third of Santa Clara County’s first coronavirus deaths had swept through just four ZIP codes in the East San Jose community where she had grown up. She wasn’t surprised by the outsized toll on the City Council district she represented: While office workers stayed home, traffic had hardly eased in East San Jose as residents went to their shifts as cooks, cleaners and grocery store employees. Yet as of mid-May, the two testing sites in East San Jose were open only by appointment on weekdays, and many Spanish speakers still didn’t know what to do if they got sick on the job. Key Words: Pandemic, Coronavirus
NEWS - Violence and hate against Asian Americans is a health and safety crisis for everyone
3/17/21 Public outings carry extra danger for Asian people, with a spate of recent attacks targeted against Asian elders that have resulted in racial trauma, injury, and death. Asian elders are perceived as vulnerable. Volunteer escorts, private guards and air horns aren't enough. We need government support and commitment. Key Words: Hate Crime, AAPI
NEWS - ‘We are done:’ Rally decries wave of anti-Asian hate crimes in the Bay Area
3/13/21 SAN JOSE — Recounting the harassment, discrimination and racism Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have endured for decades in the Bay Area, elected officials, community leaders and residents rallied in front of San Jose City Hall on Saturday to decry a wave of hate crimes that have rocked the region in recent months. “Now is the time for non-Asian allies to stand up in solidarity with our Asian and Pacific Islander neighbors,” San Jose Councilmember Pam Foley, who organized the rally along with Low, told the crowd of about 200 people. “It is our responsibility to make it absolutely clear that hate has no place in our community, that racism and bigotry will not be tolerated in San Jose.”
NEWS- Our Post-Covid Lives Shouldn’t Go Back to ‘Normal’—They Should Go Back Better
4/2/21 Op-Ed By Susan Ellenberg Covid-19 stripped down our support structures and shone an unforgiving light on the pre-existing gaps in services for our county’s families, specifically as they relate to health, food and internet access. Those gaps are holding our community back and it is our collective responsibility to not only bridge those gaps but take us further together. Key Words: COVID-19, Pandemic
RESEARCH - 2021 Cyberhate - Online Hate and Harrassment.pdf
According to the latest results from ADL’s annual survey of hate and harassment on social media, despite the seeming blitz of self-regulation from technology companies, the level of online hate and harassment reported by users barely shifted when compared to reports from a year ago. This is the third consecutive year ADL has conducted its nationally representative survey. Forty-one percent of Americans said they had experienced online harassment over the past year, comparable to the 44% reported in last year’s “Online Hate and Harassment” report. Severe online harassment comprising sexual harassment, stalking, physical threats, swatting, doxing and sustained harassment also remained relatively constant compared to the prior year, experienced by 27% of respondents, not a significant change from the 28% reported in the previous survey.
RESOURCE - FEMA COVID-19 Funeral Assistance
Under the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 and the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, FEMA will provide financial assistance for COVID-19-related funeral expenses incurred after January 20, 2020. FEMA will begin accepting applications for Funeral Assistance on Monday, April 12, 2021 through our dedicated call center. More information will be available on this page soon. Additional guidance is being finalized and will be released to potential applicants and community partners as soon as possible. In the meantime, people who have COVID-19 funeral expenses are encouraged to keep and gather documentation. Key Words: Pandemic Multi-language: Spanish | Chinese | Vietnamese | Portuguese | Creole |
USCIS - Public Charge Update
3/12/21 USCIS is no longer applying the August 2019 Public Charge Final Rule. As a consequence, among other changes, USCIS will apply the public charge inadmissibility statute consistent with the 1999 Interim Field Guidance. In other words, USCIS is not considering an applicant’s receipt of Medicaid (except for long-term institutionalization at the government’s expense), public housing, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits as part of the public charge inadmissibility determination. Multi-language: Spanish
VIDEO - Effects of Anti-Asian Racism During the Pandemic
CAN/DID: Standing Against Racism and Injustice is an ongoing multimedia series that builds on the knowledge and experience of De Anza College students, faculty and classified professionals An exploration of equity and social justice issues – including lessons we can all learn from the struggles of many different groups and individuals Key Words: Diversity, Chinese, COVID-19
IMMIGRANTS - A statement from Asian American Community Organizations and Allies Demanding Action and Solidarity Against Violence
2/12/21 As community-based organizations and foundations committed to racial equity and justice for Asian and Pacific Islander, Black, Indigenous, and Latino communities of color, we come together to send a clear, unified message of solidarity opposing xenophobia, discrimination, and violence. We denounce the recent violent crimes perpetrated against the elderly Asian American community within the Bay Area and nationally. We stand in solidarity with the victims, their families, and all who have been affected by these horrific acts. Key Words: Hate Crimes, SCC, Santa Clara County, pandemic, COVID-19
NEWS - Fake news: Recognizing and stemming misinformation
9/17 Fake news is information that is fabricated (made up) and packaged to appear as fact. Unlike satire or other forms of humor, fake news attempts to deliberately mislead or deceive its audience, often with the goal of financial, political or other type of gain. Fake news often uses attention-grabbing headlines to draw as large an audience as possible. Being able to evaluate the accuracy of what you read or hear, and refraining from spreading false stories, will help you and others avoid the repercussions of fake news. Spanish
IMMIGRANTS - CA HR-23 Anti Asian Hate Crime Resolution
2/16/21 Resolved by the Assembly of the State of California, That the Assembly denounces hate crimes, hateful rhetoric, and hateful acts against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and works to ensure that APIs feel safe and welcome, both during this COVID-19 pandemic and beyond...
IMMIGRANTS - 'I Will Not Stand Silent.' 10 Asian Americans Reflect on Racism During the Pandemic and the Need for Equality
6/25/20 Today, as the U.S. struggles to combat a global pandemic that has taken the lives of more than 120,000 Americans and put millions out of work, President Donald Trump, who has referred to COVID-19 as the “Chinese virus” and more recently the “kung flu,” has helped normalize anti-Asian xenophobia, stoking public hysteria and racist attacks. And now, as in the past, it’s not just Chinese Americans receiving the hatred. Racist aggressors don’t distinguish between different ethnic subgroups—anyone who is Asian or perceived to be Asian at all can be a victim. Even wearing a face mask, an act associated with Asians before it was recommended in the U.S., could be enough to provoke an attack. Key Words: Hate Crimes