Welcome

Immigrantinfo.org’s mission is to support a healthy and resilient community for everyone through successful integration of immigrants, refugees and asylees into our society. Our intention is to create a collaborative space that facilitates connection, cooperation and focus on our common goals. We invite the submission of information about news, classes, resources, and community events of interest to Santa Clara County immigrants.

The continuing challenge of COVID-19 will be influencing our activities for some time. Programs continue to evolve in accordance with guidance from the Department of Health, changing needs and resources. We are trying to keep up with the simultaneous program changes of hundreds of resource links and this is made possible by the assistance of the community.  Please notify us of your events, ESL and Citizenship classes listed, and program changes, so that we can keep the information current.

We will continue to post important news and information on our COVID-19 page focusing attention on identifying and developing needed resources for those who will be most vulnerable in this pandemic. Please also share information about any resources or events that would be of benefit to the community or decision makers. Contact us at: Administrator@Immigrantinfo.org

Announcements

In the News

DEMOGRAPHICS - Racism Is a Public Health Crisis, Say Cities and CountiesRacism Is a Public Health Crisis, Say Cities and Counties
6/15/20 Being black is bad for your health. And pervasive racism is the cause. That’s the conclusion of multiple public health studies over more than three decades. “We do know that health inequities at their very core are due to racism,” said Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association. “There’s no doubt about that.” More recently, research has shown that racial health disparities don’t just affect poor African Americans, but they also cross class lines, Benjamin said. “As a black man, my status, my suit and tie don’t protect me.”
DISASTER - FEMA FAQ - Citizenship Status and Eligibility for Disaster Assistance
11/15/19 FEMA Fact Sheet with disaster relief eligibility information for non-citizens. Key Words: Undocumented Multi-language: Spanish | Vietnamese | Chinese | Korean
DISASTER - FEMA Individual Assistance Application Deadline 11/23/20
10/15/20 2 more counties have been added to the CA Wildfires DR-4558-CA Amendment 007. Counties currently designated for Individual Assistance are: Butte, Lake, Lassen, Monterey, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma, Tulare, and Yolo Counties. Disaster survivors may apply for the Individuals and Households Program or check their application status at DisasterAssistance.gov or call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-3362 to register for assistance or check their application status. Deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability and use TTY may call 800-462-7585. Disaster survivors who use 711 or VRS (Video Relay Service) may call 800-621-3362. Wildfire Survivors Can Apply for Federal Aid Even if Insured
DISASTER - How California can recover from wildfires without leaving its most vulnerable behind
9/11/20 “While people claim that disasters do not discriminate, there are human decisions that make some populations more vulnerable than others,” said Michael Méndez, an assistant professor at the University of California, Irvine, who co-authored the article. “The big picture is understanding that systemic racism and cultural norms determine who is a worthy disaster victim.”
DISASTER - How California’s farmworkers are banding together to survive the pandemic
9/24/20 A COVID-19 relief package for California’s farmworkers landed on Governor Gavin Newsom’s desk last week. Legislators describe the bill as the first of its kind, and it addresses a wide array of issues, from workplace enforcement of COVID-19 guidance to the expansion of rural telehealth services across the state. But, as the novel coronavirus continues to tear through farmworker communities, such measures may not be enough. Interviews with farmworkers throughout the state reveal a safety net stretched to the limit: Desperate parents are calling relief and advocacy groups for basic needs like diapers for their babies, quarantined farmworkers sick with COVID-19 are relying on colleagues for deliveries of food and other supplies, and some workers have lost their jobs after calling for better safety measures in the fields and packing plants where they work.
DISASTER - Inclusive emergency Response - Immigrants Essential and Vulnerable in San José
8/7/20 New research from New American Economy (NAE) released today in partnership with the City of San José highlights how immigrants are both essential to San José’s rapid response efforts and especially vulnerable due to gaps in federal relief packages, language access barriers, and increased risks of infection associated with frontline and essential work. San José is one of twelve recipients of NAE research to inform culturally sensitive emergency response measures that ensure all residents are included, regardless of immigration status. Key Words: COVID-19, Coronavirus, Disaster, undocumented
HEALTH - COVID-19 infections among Latinx seeing sharp decline in Santa Clara County
9/28/20 After data busted the myth that COVID-19 was “the great equalizer” and made it clear the disease has had disproportionate affects on Santa Clara County’s Latinx population, public health officials say rates finally are starting to decrease in the hardest hit communities. “The rates among the Latinx community were really soaring in July. They were across the county but particularly steep in the Latinx community and to some extent in the African American community,” said Public Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody. “We are now seeing the rates decline not just across the county but most steeply among the Latinx community.”
HEALTH - Home Isolation and Quarantine Guidance - Contact Tracing
8/7/20 The goals of case investigation and contact tracing are to support individuals who may be positive for COVID-19 to safely stay home and slow the spread of Coronavirus among their family, friends, and community. Multi-language: Spanish | Vietnamese | Chinese | Tagalog
HEALTH - Isolation & Quarantine Support Services
Santa Clara County COVID-19 Support Team provides resources to County residents who test positive for COVID-19 or are identified as contacts to a positive case to enable them to isolate or quarantine safely. There are three main components to the program: 1. a motel with supportive services for cases and contacts who cannot safely isolate or quarantine at home or who do not have a home. 2.support services for persons who can isolate and quarantine at home, but who need some assistance. 3. rental and utility bills specifically for individuals and families participating in this Program. Each household may be eligible for up to $5,000. *Individuals must qualify based on income of 80% AMI (Area Median Income) or less. Spanish Vietnamese Chinese Tagalog
HEALTH - Lack of Access to Information Implies Double Risk for Latinos During The COVID-19 Pandemic
8/18/20 As reported by NBC News, the combination of mass misinformation on social media and inconsistent signals from the U.S. government is now a “particular threat” to communities of color in the country, which continue to represent the highest rates of infection and hospitalization. The media explains that the fact that these communities have higher levels of mistrust of government, less access to health care, and lack of information in Spanish is now “a dangerous mix.”
HEALTH - San Jose leaders approve recommendations to address COVID-19 health disparities
9/2/20 San Jose leaders unanimously accepted 30 recommendations Sept. 1 from Santa Clara County’s Health and Equity Task Force to tackle growing health disparities in the time of COVID-19. The recommendations include translating emergency information, contact-tracing, extending rent relief, distributing food and adding additional COVID-19 testing sites. Councilmember Magdalena Carrasco said as of Aug. 31, more than 170 cases were reported in Santa Clara County, but many residents still don’t know where to get the services they need.
IMMIGRANTS - Data and Analysis Related to Trump Administration Actions on Immigrant and Refugee Policy
8/1/20 Since entering office, the Trump administration has proposed or implemented policies on a wide range of immigration issues, touching on everything from asylum to deportation policy, refugee resettlement, and admissions from certain majority-Muslim countries. These MPI research and data resources offer context to policy changes achieved and proposed, as well as the populations they affect. For a record of immigration developments since the Trump administration began, check out this resource: Dismantling and Reconstructing the U.S. Immigration System: A Catalog of Changes under the Trump Presidency.
IMMIGRANTS - San Jose legislator Zoe Lofgren pushes for immigration reforms amid COVID-19
9/25/20 Rep. Zoe Lofgren called for immigration reform this week during a congressional hearing examining the role of undocumented immigrants in the essential workforce. The San Jose Democrat said essential workers, such as those working in agriculture or food processing, have risked their lives by continuing to work in-person throughout the coronavirus pandemic. “Many immigrant essential workers are undocumented and live under the constant threat of removal,” she said. “Many others are protected by temporary programs, such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or the Temporary Protected Status, but they too live in fear as a result of the (Trump) administration’s efforts to terminate these programs. They deserve better.”
IMMIGRANTS - USCIS Fee Rule Halted in Its Entirety in Response to Litigation Filed by AILA and Sidley Austin LLP
9/30/20 AILA applauds the Court’s expeditious order to set aside USCIS’s unprecedented attempt to dramatically raise fees prior to November’s Presidential Election. The DHS’s Fee Rule, which would have doubled or tripled application fees for many essential immigration benefits, was set to go into effect on October 2, 2020.Not only did Judge White carefully identify that DHS leadership did not have the authority to issue the rule, Judge White recognized that the government pushed to increase fees arbitrarily without considering important concerns identified by plaintiffs and thousands of commenters in opposition to the rule, including the negative impact the rule would have on low-income immigrant populations and those seeking asylum.
IMMIGRANTS - USCIS Wants To Increase the Amount of Biometric Data It Collects by Over 60%
9/9/20 The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced plans to dramatically expand the personal information that it collects in support of immigration petitions and applications. This new rule will increase the total number of people who are required to submit biometric data from 3.9 million currently to 6.07 million—an increase of more than 60%. The proposed rule increases the pool of people who must provide biometrics to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) by requiring biometrics from individuals of any age. This will further scrutinize children, and discourage victims of crime from being able to navigate the complex U.S. immigration system.
NEWS - - ICE preparing targeted arrests in ‘sanctuary cities,’ amplifying president’s campaign theme
9/29/20 The Trump administration is preparing an immigration enforcement blitz next month that would target arrests in U.S. cities and jurisdictions that have adopted “sanctuary” policies, according to three U.S. officials who described a plan with public messaging that echoes the president’s law-and-order campaign rhetoric.
NEWS - San Jose’s newly created Office of Racial Equity
10/3/20 Zulma Maciel, director of the city’s Office of Immigrant Affairs and a daughter of Mexican immigrants, has been selected to lead the city’s newly-created Office of Racial Equity, marking the first public step by the city to address inequities in its policies, programs and spending.
NEWS - Silicon Valley leaders say struggle for racial equity is long but next steps are clear
8/30/20 Achieving racial equity in Silicon Valley and the nation will take more than protests and some changes in legislative bodies. It’s going to take deep, systemic and hard-fought change. That’s according to a diverse panel of five experts who discussed race and equity in a virtual forum hosted by San José Spotlight and moderated by Rick Callender, vice president of the California/Hawaii NAACP and a board member of this news organization.
VOTING - Safe at Home CA Registration
Safe at Home is a free, confidential address program administered by the CA Secretary of State's office and is most effective when used as a part of an overall safety plan. It offers victims of domestic violence, stalking, sexual assault, human trafficking & elder and dependent abuse, as well as reproductive health care workers, a substitute mailing address to receive first class, certified, and registered mail. This address is also accepted by California state, county, and city government agencies in lieu of a residential or other mailing address where a victim can be tracked down, keeping the residence address confidential and out of the hands of someone who might want to harm the victim. Key Words: DV, mental health,
NEWS - Fake news: Recognizing and stemming misinformation
9/17 Fake news is information that is fabricated (made up) and packaged to appear as fact. Unlike satire or other forms of humor, fake news attempts to deliberately mislead or deceive its audience, often with the goal of financial, political or other type of gain. Fake news often uses attention-grabbing headlines to draw as large an audience as possible. Being able to evaluate the accuracy of what you read or hear, and refraining from spreading false stories, will help you and others avoid the repercussions of fake news. Spanish
DISASTER - Tzu Chi Providing Care and Support After Northern California’s Lightning Complex Fire
9/4/20 The CZU fire in the southern Bay Area was one of three major fire sites in the Bay Area. Minjhing Hsieh, Executive Director of Tzu Chi’s Northwest region, visited the Santa Cruz County shelter for the first time on August 27th alongside volunteers Grace Chen and CM Yung. Volunteers learned more about the shelter from the site manager, Mark Larson, who told them that the area is 110 acres, has 71 cabins, and a parking lot that can accommodate 150 RVs. On August 20, nearly 500 evacuees occupied the shelter, of which, about two hundred people lived in the cabins, and about three hundred lived in 130 RVs.
EMPLOYMENT - Maintaining effective U.S. labor standards enforcement through the coronavirus recession
9/3/20 Evidence from the Great Recession of 2007—2009 indicates that high levels of unemployment weaken the labor market power of those low-wage workers who remain employed. Minimum wage violations increased dramatically during the Great Recession, disproportionately impacting Latinx, Black, and female workers. We anticipate the coronavirus recession will result in increased violations, yet as high unemployment adds to workers’ desperation to maintain any job, the likelihood that low-wage workers will file complaints with an enforcement agency will decrease.
HEALTH - InformaGente COVID-19 Youtube conversation for Latinx Community
Listos California, in partnership with the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts (NHFA), launched "InformaGente," a new online conversation series to foster a culture of emergency readiness among Latinx communities. 5/28/20 The first InformaGente conversation features actor Nicholas Gonzalez, star of ABC’s The Good Doctor, and Dr. Gil Chavez, Senior Advisor to the Director of the California Department of Public Health. Dr. Chavez and Mr. Gonzalez discuss issues related to COVID-19 from hand washing and physical distancing, to concerns about visiting a doctor due to immigration status. Multi-language: Spanish
HEALTH - Silicon Valley lawmaker examines links between racism, the environment and COVID-19
7/17/20 During a committee hearing this week, U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren of San Jose said the coronavirus pandemic has clearly exposed systemic racism in the United States. “It didn’t create it, but it revealed the divisions,” she said. “We have an opportunity now to examine the broad scope of that and to come up with a path forward for change.” The congresswoman was speaking at a virtual hearing to discuss the links between racism, environmental hazards and the coronavirus pandemic.