Welcome

Immigrantinfo.org’s mission is to support a healthy and resilient community for everyone through successful integration of immigrants, refugees and asylees into our society. Our intention is to create a collaborative space that facilitates connection, cooperation and focus on our common goals. We invite the submission of information about news, classes, resources, and community events of interest to Santa Clara County immigrants.

The continuing challenge of COVID-19 will be influencing our activities for some time. Programs continue to evolve in accordance with guidance from the Department of Health, changing needs and resources. We are trying to keep up with the simultaneous program changes of hundreds of resource links and this is made possible by the assistance of the community.  Please notify us of your events, ESL and Citizenship classes listed, and program changes, so that we can keep the information current.

We will continue to post important news and information on our COVID-19 page focusing attention on identifying and developing needed resources for those who will be most vulnerable in this pandemic. Please also share information about any resources or events that would be of benefit to the community or decision makers. Contact us at: Administrator@Immigrantinfo.org

Announcements

In the News

DEMOGRAPHICS - Many Latinos Couldn’t Stay Home. Now Virus Cases Are Soaring in Their Communities.
6/29/20 In California, where Latinos make up 39 percent of the population and nearly 57 percent of new cases, the spikes have been particularly confounding. The state was the nation’s first to shelter in place, and cellphone data indicated that its residents were among the most committed to limiting their movement, and with it the spread of the disease. Infection rates have remained relatively low in affluent neighborhoods, including those occupied by the state’s wealthy Latinos. But sheltering in place never happened for many Latino families with members who work in industries that never shut down, making them especially vulnerable to the virus.
DEMOGRAPHICS - Silicon Valley Pain Index shows ‘white supremacy’ prevalent across institutions
6/23/20 First-ever local index highlights 65 statistics of inequality The San Jose State University Human Rights Institute on Tuesday unveiled the Silicon Valley Pain Index, the first of planned annual reports focusing on racial discrimination and income inequality in the region. Coming at a time when institutional biases against Black people and communities of color are under heightened scrutiny, the index leans on the latest available data and reporting to call out disparities such as the disproportionately high death rate of Latinos from COVID-19 in SCC and the overwhelmingly white makeup of tech company executive suites. The Silicon Valley Pain Index shows that white supremacy is operating in most all of the institutions and systems in Santa Clara County, whether it be in the criminal justice system, the economy, education, healthcare, or housing, Key Words: Diversity, Racism
EDUCATION - Trump administration drops restrictions on online-only instruction for foreign students
7/14/20 The Trump administration has rescinded its policy that would bar international students who only take online courses from staying in the US, a federal judge announced Tuesday in Boston. The decision comes a little over a week after Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that students at schools offering only online courses due to the coronavirus pandemic would need to either leave the US or transfer schools. One person familiar with the matter told CNN the White House has felt the blowback to the proposal and that some inside the West Wing believe it was poorly conceived and executed.
FOOD - How 12 million pounds of food get distributed during a pandemic
6/19/20 The coronavirus also forced Second Harvest to dramatically transform its operations. Farmers market-style distribution sites had to be reconfigured into socially distanced drive-thrus to prevent the spread of the virus. They started delivering food to thousands of homebound low-income seniors. They stopped accepting canned food donations from the community. With most volunteers — who made up 40% of Second Harvest's workforce — unable to come in during the shelter-in-place, the nonprofit relied on the United States Army National Guard, temporary workers and staff from partner agencies to sort and package food. "Everything changed overnight," Second Harvest spokesperson Diane Baker Hayward said.
HEALTH - Asian Americans Facing High COVID-19 Case Fatality
7/13/20 In San Francisco, a steady trend in coronavirus (COVID-19) deaths has gone largely unnoticed until recently: Asian Americans consistently account for nearly half of COVID-19 deaths. For a city that is one-third Asian American, the disproportionate number of deaths appears striking, yet this highlights an even more worrisome statistic—Asian Americans experience a four times higher case fatality rate (CFR) than that of the overall population (5.2 percent versus 1.3 percent). Further investigation revealed that the relatively high CFR in SF reflects a pattern found across many states and counties with at least 5 percent of the population Asian American (exhibit 1). The Asian American CFR is three times that of the overall population in CA (8.4 percent versus 2.6 percent) and exceeds 10 percent in LA, Chicago, NY City, and New Jersey. In Clark County, Nevada, the 2.5 times higher CFR results in a proportion of deaths (16.8 percent) that far exceeds Asian American and Pacific Islanders’ (AAPI) share of the population (10.4 percent). Key Words: Demographics, API, immigrant
HEALTH - Home Isolation and Quarantine Guidance - Contact Tracing
8/7/20 The goals of case investigation and contact tracing are to support individuals who may be positive for COVID-19 to safely stay home and slow the spread of Coronavirus among their family, friends, and community. This strategy involves a partnership with individuals to answer our calls, to isolate or quarantine at home based on the guidance below. “Isolation” is used for a person who has had a positive test result and is likely contagious, and “quarantine” is used if a person was in close contact with someone who had a positive test result and might become contagious in the near future. Multi-language: Spanish | Vietnamese | Chinese | Tagalog
HEALTH - InformaGente COVID-19 Youtube conversation for Latinx Community
Listos California, in partnership with the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts (NHFA), launched "InformaGente," a new online conversation series to foster a culture of emergency readiness among Latinx communities. 5/28/20 The first InformaGente conversation features actor Nicholas Gonzalez, star of ABC’s The Good Doctor, and Dr. Gil Chavez, Senior Advisor to the Director of the California Department of Public Health. Dr. Chavez and Mr. Gonzalez discuss issues related to COVID-19 from hand washing and physical distancing, to concerns about visiting a doctor due to immigration status. Multi-language: Spanish
IMMIGRANTS - Immigrant families in detention have until Friday to make a difficult decision
7/14/20 Hundreds of immigrant families in US Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody may have to decide by the end of this week whether they’ll separate from their children or stay in detention together. The decision facing parents was prompted by a June court order that called for the release of children in federal family detention in light of the coronavirus pandemic. The deadline to let children go is Friday. “Moms are trying to figure out how their kids are most safe,” said Shay Fluharty from Proyecto Dilley, which provides legal services to families at the Dilley, Texas, detention center. “Is it most safe to go to a stranger? Is it most safe to continue to be in detention as the virus is getting closer and closer?”
IMMIGRANTS - One Nation Commission Report, Built on the Strength of Immigrants
10/2019 This report was published in conjunction with the Tri- Caucus (Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Congressional Black Caucus and Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus) in Washington, D.C. A resource and tool with facts, data, research, imagery, and curated stories that show that immigrants make America stronger. Key Words: Demographics, research Multi-language: Chinese | Korean | Tagalog | Mongolian | Vietnamese
IMMIGRANTS - RESEARCH - New Americans in San José
8/7/20 New research from New American Economy (NAE) released today in partnership with the City of San José highlights how immigrants are both essential to San José’s rapid response efforts and especially vulnerable due to gaps in federal relief packages, language access barriers, and increased risks of infection associated with frontline and essential work. San José is one of twelve recipients of NAE research to inform culturally sensitive emergency response measures that ensure all residents are included, regardless of immigration status. This customized research report highlights the demographic nuances of the metro area’s immigrant population and will inform the advocacy, development, and implementation of inclusive local emergency responses. Key Words: COVID-19, Coronavirus, Disaster, undocumented
IMMIGRANTS - Who’s blocked from coming to the US under Trump’s latest visa ban
6/23/20 President Trump’s latest proclamation outlines a number of new restrictions on visas for temporary foreign workers. Unless you’re an attorney or an immigrant with experience navigating the US system, the alphabet soup of visas listed in Monday’s proclamation might be tough to decipher. The bottom line: a wide range of workers, from au pairs to software engineers, will be blocked from coming to the US at least until January. And those restrictions could be extended. Key Words: H-1B,
LEGAL - Frequently Asked Questions about the new DACA Memo
7/30/20 The U.S. Supreme Court decision, followed by the order from the 4th Circuit’s mandate on June 30, required that USCIS restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (“DACA”) program, including that USCIS again process initial DACA requests and advance parole applications. However, on July 28, 2020, over a month after the Supreme Court’s decision, DHS issued a new memorandum limiting the DACA program. The memorandum requires USCIS to (1) reject all initial DACA requests, (2) reject advance parole requests from DACA recipients unless there are “exceptional circumstances,” and (3) continue accepting and processing DACA renewal requests but shift to providing DACA and work authorization for a 1-year period, rather than 2 years, for any DACA renewal request granted. From United We Dream
MENTAL HEALTH - Todo Por Mi Familia
Were you and your family separated at the border under the Zero Tolerance Policy,? Are you experiencing anger, sadness, anxiety, fear, or difficulty sleeping since you were reunified with your children? A court has ruled that you are entitled to help. Non-profit Seneca Family of Agencies, is leading Todo Por Mi Familia, a nationwide effort to coordinate referrals to local mental health providers. Call the Seneca Confidential Toll Free Hotline at 1 (844) 529-3327 or e-mail info@todopormifamilia.org. Key Words: Detention, immigration Multi-language: Spanish
NEWS - U.S. Supreme Court snubs Trump on challenge to California ‘sanctuary’ laws
6/15/20 The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed President Donald Trump a defeat in his legal showdown with the most-populous U.S. state, declining to hear his administration’s challenge to “sanctuary” laws in California that protect immigrants from deportation. The California “sanctuary” laws in question prohibit private employers in the state from voluntarily cooperating with federal immigration officials and bar local law enforcement authorities from sharing information with federal officials about the release of potentially deportable immigrants from custody. Key Words: Immigration
RESOURCE - ALA DACA Renewal Video - Scholarships Available
5/5/20 Contact Asian Law Alliance ' right away for a free consultation to see if you should renew your DACA. (408) 287-9710. Scholarships for the $495 fee are still available for eligible applicants. The Supreme Court is currently considering termination of the DACA program. A decision could come any day and if they decide to terminate the program, it will be too late. The good news is, that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is still accepting DACA renewals. If your DACA will expire within the next year or even if your DACA has expired, you may be able to renew. Key Words: Undocumented., immigration,
SCC OIR Newsletter10 - Employment Based Immigration
6/29/20 Highly Skilled Immigrants Barred from Entering the U. S. Until 2021 On June 22nd, the Trump Administration extended and expanded its April proclamation that barred certain immigrants from the U.S. for an initial period of 60 days. In April, Trump already banned people with certain "non-immigrant visas" from entering the U.S., including immigrants on work-related visas and family members of U.S. citizens and diversity visa applicants. The ban is now extended through the end of the year. The administration is also restricting immigrants who are here on employment-based visas: H-1B, H-2B, L from entering the U.S. if they traveled abroad.
San Jose takes pride in its diversity but has no in-house translators
7/23/20 With more than half the households in San Jose speaking a language other than English, the nation’s 10th largest city doesn’t have full-time staff dedicated to translation and interpretation at City Hall. Without full-time translators on staff, San Jose Councilmember Magdalena Carrasco, whose constituents include many monolingual Spanish speakers, has come to expect her own bilingual-certified team to fill the void.
Silicon Valley lawmaker examines links between racism, the environment and COVID-19
7/17/20 During a committee hearing this week, U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren of San Jose said the coronavirus pandemic has clearly exposed systemic racism in the United States. “It didn’t create it, but it revealed the divisions,” she said. “We have an opportunity now to examine the broad scope of that and to come up with a path forward for change.” The congresswoman was speaking at a virtual hearing to discuss the links between racism, environmental hazards and the coronavirus pandemic.
TRANSPORTATION - Clipper START Card
Save on San Francisco Bay Area transit. with a pilot program to provide single-ride discounts to eligible riders. Participants can receive: a 50% discount on Caltrain, Muni, and Golden Gate Transit and Ferry, and a 20% discount on BART, To qualify, you must...**Be a resident of the San Francisco Bay Area **Be 19-64 years old **Not have an RTC Clipper Card for people with disabilities **Have a household income of 200% of the federal poverty level or less. Multi-language: Spanish, Chinese, Tagalog
VOTING - Safe at Home Voting Registration
Safe at Home is a confidential address program administered by the CA Secretary of State's office and is most effective when used as a part of an overall safety plan. Safe at Home offers victims of domestic violence, stalking, sexual assault, human trafficking & elder and dependent abuse, as well as reproductive health care workers, a substitute mailing address to receive first class, certified, and registered mail. This address is also accepted by California state, county, and city government agencies in lieu of a residential or other mailing address where a victim can be tracked down, keeping the residence address confidential and out of the hands of someone who might want to harm the victim. This program is provided free of charge to California residents who qualify as participants.
HEALTH - NIH All of Us Research Program
The All of Us Research Program is inviting one million people across the U.S. to help build one of the most diverse health databases in history. We welcome participants from all backgrounds. Researchers will use the data to learn how our biology, lifestyle, and environment affect health. This could help them develop better treatments and ways to prevent different diseases. The mission of the All of Us Research Program is to accelerate health research and medical breakthroughs, enabling individualized prevention, treatment, and care for all of us.
NEWS - Fake news: Recognizing and stemming misinformation
9/17 Fake news is information that is fabricated (made up) and packaged to appear as fact. Unlike satire or other forms of humor, fake news attempts to deliberately mislead or deceive its audience, often with the goal of financial, political or other type of gain. Fake news often uses attention-grabbing headlines to draw as large an audience as possible. Being able to evaluate the accuracy of what you read or hear, and refraining from spreading false stories, will help you and others avoid the repercussions of fake news. Spanish
NEWS - Farmworkers deserve workplace protections too - Ash Kalra
3/31/20 Today we celebrate the birthday of the visionary labor leader and community activist, Cesar Chavez. His contribution to the fight for economic and social justice for California’s farmworkers underscores the fact that we still have much to accomplish to ensure fair and safe working conditions for these workers. As our state addresses the overwhelming task of combating the coronavirus, we must mitigate the impacts on workers, and in particular, our most vulnerable ones. We need to dedicate resources to protect the health of California’s farmworkers. When a farmworker is diagnosed with the coronavirus, other farmworkers who were exposed to that worker should be paid to take the number of sick days recommended to self-quarantine. The $9.5 billion farmers are receiving in federal emergency assistance makes this possible.
CHILDREN - Multi-language Children's Book
Manuela Molina created this short book to support and reassure children under the age of 7, regarding the COVID-19. This book is an invitation for families to discuss the full range of emotions arising from the current situation. This resource does not seek to be a source of scientific information, but rather a tool based on fantasy. Print this material so children can draw on it. Emotions are processed through repetitive play and stories read multiple times. Share COVIBOOK and help ease kiddo's anxiety all over the world. Multi-language: English, Arabic, French, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Indonedian, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Turkish Key Words: Pandemic flu, mental health, disaster
NEWS - A Century of U.S. Intervention Created the Immigration Crisis
6/20/18 Those seeking asylum today inherited a series of crises that drove them to the border. At the margins of the mainstream discursive stalemate over immigration lies over a century of historical U.S. intervention that politicians and pundits on both sides of the aisle seem determined to silence. Since Theodore Roosevelt in 1904 declared the U.S.’s right to exercise an “international police power” in Latin America, the U.S. has cut deep wounds throughout the region, leaving scars that will last for generations to come. This history of intervention is inextricable from the contemporary Central American crisis of internal and international displacement and migration. Key Words: Asylum, Immigration Law, Deportation, TPS,
CHILDREN - Detaining migrant kids now a multi-billion dollar industry
7/12/18 Detaining immigrant children has morphed into a surging industry in the U.S. that now reaps $1 billion annually - a tenfold increase over the past decade, an Associated Press analysis finds. Health and Human Services grants for shelters, foster care and other child welfare services for detained unaccompanied and separated children soared from $74.5 million in 2007 to $958 million dollars in 2017. The agency is also reviewing a new round of proposals amid a growing effort by the White House to keep immigrant children in government custody. Currently, more than 11,800 children, from a few months old to 17, are housed in nearly 90 facilities in 15 states; Arizona, California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington.
LEGAL- Coronavirus could overwhelm legal help for America's poor
4/1/20 Often overlooked and already short on resources, civil legal aid groups in the COVID-19 era are among the first responders for Americans who need help navigating the legal system to fight unfair evictions and foreclosures, get domestic abuse protective orders, obtain unemployment or unpaid wages, access health care or respond to scammers. These groups now face an unprecedented crunch from all sides as the nation's poor take the brunt of the faltering economy and skyrocketing unemployment numbers. The closure of businesses for social distancing will not only increase the number of people with those legal problems but also increase the number of people who qualify as low income.
NEWS - NewsGuard - Avoid coronavirus hoaxes
Avoid coronavirus hoaxes and other misinformation with NewsGuard. Now free until July 1st for the COVID-19 crisis. Trust ratings for 4,000+ news and information sites–written by trained journalists based on nine journalistic criteria. We tell you who’s behind each site, how it’s funded, and whether you can trust it.