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Immigrantinfo.org’s mission is to support a healthy and resilient community for everyone through successful integration of immigrants, refugees and asylees into our society. Our intention is to create a collaborative space that facilitates connection, cooperation and focus on our common goals. We invite the submission of information about news, classes, resources, and community events of interest to Santa Clara County immigrants.

COVID-19 continues to be an influence in our lives and we continue to post important news, information and resources in the COVID-19 Section.  Service Providers have been challenged to stay in sync with guidelines from the Department of Health, along with evolving needs and changing resources. We have eliminated the detailed listing of Santa Clara County ESL Classes, in order to focus on the program changes and the many local, state and national COVID relief resources.  

We continue to maintain the Immigrant Info Section, with multi-language pages with information on Disaster Preparation and Response, Immigration and Citizenship, Education, ESL Tools and Resources, the Rapid Response Network, and local Santa Clara County news and resources.

Please notify us of any necessary changes or updates to postings  on the site, so that we can keep the information current nd accurate.  Contact us at: Administrator@Immigrantinfo.org

Announcements

In the News

AFGHANISTAN - Afghan resettlement raises the question- Who is coming to the U.S.?
9/5/21 With tens of thousands of Afghans arriving at the end of America’s longest war, such comments from witnesses and government officials have left a question looming over the coming weeks, one that is already dividing host communities from Missoula, Mont., to Jacksonville, Fla.: Who is coming to the United States? The emerging picture is more complicated than President Biden’s depiction of the airlift that whisked planeloads of Afghans to safety as a moral imperative to save people who helped Americans during a difficult conflict despite the risk. “We got thousands of Afghan translators and interpreters, and others who supported the United States, out,” he said recently. Key Words: Refugees, Asylum
AFGHANISTAN - How the Red Cross and Red Crescent are Helping
9/15/21 As uncertainty in Afghanistan continues, Red Cross and Red Crescent teams are providing humanitarian relief to families inside and outside the country. For its part, the American Red Cross is helping those making their way out of Afghanistan who are in transit and arriving in other countries.
AFGHANISTAN - Pathways to Protection for Afghans at Risk
9/1/21 from NILC (Nat Immigration Law Center) On August 31, President Biden announced the full withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan and the conclusion of “the largest airlift in U.S. history,” a 17-day evacuation of approximately 120,000 people from Hamid Karzai airport in Kabul. In addition to U.S. citizens and citizens of other allied nations, among those evacuated were at-risk Afghans who assisted the U.S. military effort or who were otherwise under threat. The U.S. has announced three different immigration pathways that are being used to evacuate and resettle vulnerable Afghans: Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) status, the Priority 2 (P2) Refugee Program, and Humanitarian Parole.
AFGHANISTAN - Where Afghan refugees are expected to be resettled, by state
9/16/21 The Biden administration this week notified state authorities of the number of Afghan evacuees each state could receive in the coming weeks as part of the first phase of a massive resettlement operation that is slated to place nearly 37,000 refugees from Afghanistan in U.S. communities. California is expected to receive 5,225 Afghan evacuees, the most of any state. Texas is set to receive 4,481 Afghans, followed by Oklahoma, which is expected to host 1,800 evacuees. Washington state and Arizona are each slated to receive more than 1,600 evacuees.
DEMOGRAPHICS - Afghan Immigrants in the United States
9/7/21 The dramatic aftermath of the U.S. military departure from Afghanistan after 20 years of war and rapid rise of the Taliban prompted a chaotic evacuation of Afghan allies and others to the United States and other countries. The U.S. government has said it expects that at least 50,000 Afghans will eventually be brought to the United States, as part of one of the largest airlifts of its kind in U.S. history. As of September 3, nearly 34,000 U.S.-bound Afghans were being housed at U.S. and NATO bases in the Middle East and Europe; another nearly 26,000 evacuees were at eight military facilities in the United States.
DEMOGRAPHICS - Bay Area’s rising Asian and Hispanic populations are driving region’s growth, census reveals
8/12/21 The percentage of White residents fell in every county while the share of Latino residents grew in all but Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. That’s a trend now being mirrored across the country, where the population of White residents shrank over the past decade for the first time while the number of Asian and Latino Americans rose.
DISASTER - Northern California secures federal disaster declaration
8/25/21 The White House has approved California’s request for a Presidential Major Disaster Declaration, as wildfires continue to ravage landscapes and threaten entire communities in the northern part of the state, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s (D) office announced. The declaration will help bolster emergency response to the fires by making additional resources available and helping residents qualify for housing assistance, counseling, medical services and legal services. The approval applies specifically to the regions affected by the Dixie and River fires, although other blazes, like the Caldor Fire, may be included later on, according to the governor’s office.
EMPLOYMENT - Santa Clara County wants employers to require vaccines for employees
7/22/21 Health officers from three Bay Area counties announced Thursday that they want all employers to require their employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19, with few exceptions. “With the rise in COVID-19 cases leaving unvaccinated individuals at risk for serious illness and death, the health officers of Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Francisco counties strongly urge all employers to consider implementing workplace COVID-19 safety protocols that require their workforce to get fully vaccinated as soon as possible,” said Dr. George Han, deputy health officer for Santa Clara County. “We know vaccines are the best tool we have to combat COVID-19 and they are safe and effective even in the context of the Delta variant.”
ETHNIC - Asian American lawmakers urge DOJ to give updates about hate crimes law
9/22/21 President Joe Biden signed the legislation, co-sponsored by Hirono and Meng, on May 20 after it win bipartisan support in Congress. It directed the Justice Department to expedite the review of Covid-19-related hate crimes that were reported to law enforcement agencies to help them create ways to report such incidents online and to conduct public outreach.
ETHNIC - Latinos own and disown 'Hispanic' in journey to harness identity
9/16/21 As Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off, Latinos grapple with the decadeslong debate on whether or not the pan-ethnic terms that exist to identify their communities truly represent their lived experiences.
HEALTH - CDC Recommends COVID-19 Vaccines for Pregnant Women
8/11/21 The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday urged pregnant women and women who were recently pregnant to get vaccinated for COVID-19, saying there was mounting evidence that the benefits of the vaccine far outweighed any known or potential risks. The CDC said on its website that the current COVID-19 vaccines were recommended for all people 12 years and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding or trying to get pregnant. The agency also said that although the overall risk of severe illness was low, pregnant and recently pregnant women were more likely to get severely ill with COVID-19 compared with nonpregnant women. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine can protect them from severe illness
HEALTH - How COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy puts others at risk
5/8/21 As long as some people remain hesitant to get the shot, the virus will continue to circulate – and could cause infection in others, whose immune systems aren’t vigorous enough to fully defend them. They’re insulated only when so many other people are fully vaccinated that the virus can’t find enough people to infect, then stops its spread. The vulnerable include elders, people born with faulty immune systems and people who must take immunosuppressant drugs for illnesses ranging from cancer to rheumatoid arthritis. Also at risk are people who would love to be vaccinated, but can’t because of life-threatening allergies.
HEALTH - L.A. urges masks inside for vaccinated. Bay Area to follow?
6/30/21 Mask freedom for the vaccinated has proven short-lived in Los Angeles, where county health officials are urging everyone to keep wearing face coverings in grocery and retail stores, theaters and other indoor places in which state and national guidance now says the immunized don’t need them. And while state and Bay Area health officials aren’t signaling a similar walk-back of the mask rule they loosened just two weeks ago, several infectious disease experts said with the troubling COVID-19 Delta variant on the rise, a recommendation such as L.A. County’s wouldn’t be a bad idea. Key Words: Pandemic
HEALTH - More Contagious Delta Variant Now Dominating California
7/7/21 The rapid spread of the more contagious Delta variant is now causing concern among health officials who warn of a possible outbreak of the infection in communities with low vaccination rates. While people who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 may have high protection levels against the more transmissible variant, people who have not yet received vaccine shots have fallen ill, according to a data analysis by the Los Angeles Times. The Delta variant is believed to be at least 60% more transmissible than the Alpha variant... Key Words COVID-19
HEALTH - Older undocumented immigrants to get Medi-Cal health care in CA
6/30/21 California plans to extend Medi-Cal health coverage to some 235,000 low-income undocumented immigrants over the age of 50 – offering the most expansive health coverage in the nation to people without legal residency. The state already offers Medi-Cal health care to immigrant children and young adults under the age of 26. This latest expansion, once it receives final approval, will mean that many undocumented immigrants, except those who are 26 to 50, will be eligible.
HEALTH - The Delta Variant Is a Grave Danger to the Unvaccinated
6/23/21 First detected in India, Delta has at least a dozen mutations, including several ... that make it vastly more contagious and possibly more lethal and vaccine-resistant. In India, the Delta variant contributed to the most devastating coronavirus wave the world has seen so far; Delta drives an even wider wedge between vaccinated and unvaccinated people. They have already been living in separate worlds, facing vastly different risks of illness and death; now, their risk levels will diverge further. People who’ve been fully vaccinated can, by and large, feel confident in the immunity that they’ve received. But those who remain susceptible should understand that, for them, this is probably the most dangerous moment of the pandemic.
HEATH - 5 Things To Know About the Delta Variant
7/22/21 For the first time in more than a year, we’re feeling some hope—or at least cautious optimism—that the pandemic could recede to the background. But experts want us to know that there is still a concern that new mutations of the virus could bring it back, and it might be even stronger. From what we know so far, people who are fully vaccinated against the coronavirus appear to have protection against Delta, but anyone who is unvaccinated and not practicing preventive strategies is at risk for infection by the new variant, the doctors say. Key Words: Pandemic, COVID-19
HOUSING - Congress fails to extend national COVID eviction ban
7/31/21 More than 3.6 million Americans are at risk of eviction, some in a matter of days. A nationwide eviction moratorium is set to expire Saturday after President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress worked furiously but ultimately failed to align on a long-shot strategy to prevent millions of Americans from being forced from their homes during a COVID-19 surge. More than 3.6 million Americans are at risk of eviction, some in a matter of days, as nearly $47 billion in federal housing aid to the states during the pandemic has been slow to make it into the hands of renters and landlords owed payments.
HOUSING - Gov. Newsom, lawmakers agree to extend eviction ban, cover back rent
6/25/21 The proposal — funded by $7.2 billion in federal and state money — would fully reimburse landlords for debt accrued by tenants during the pandemic and cover missed utility bills, making it among the most generous packages in the country. It also directs money toward city and county relief programs overwhelmed with demand, and it allows renters to directly receive relief payments even if their landlords refuse to apply. The bill extends an eviction ban to September 30, the third extension of renter protections since Newsom’s executive order in March 2020. The emergency bill needs approval of the legislature by Wednesday. KEY WORDS: covid-19, Pandemic
IMMIGRANTS - 7 Immigration Myths We Must Unlearn to Reclaim Our Humanity
Our immigration system is broken and cruel. Trump was enabled in turning the cruelty up to 11 by an infrastructure he inherited. It must be reengineered before another madman is allowed to hack American ideals to that extent again. But fixing it demands that we examine — then toss into the ash heap of history — the myths on which our archaic, even barbaric, immigration apparatus rests.
IMMIGRANTS - For U.S. Latinos, COVID-19 Has Taken a Personal and Financial Toll
7/15/21 More than a year into the pandemic, Latinos in the United States say COVID-19 has harmed them and their loved ones in many ways. About half say a family member or close friend has been hospitalized or died from the coronavirus, and a similar share say they or someone in their household has lost a job or taken a pay cut during the pandemic. Yet amid these hardships, Latinos are upbeat about the future. Nearly two-thirds say the worst of the coronavirus outbreak is behind the country, and a majority say they expect their financial situation and that of their family to improve over the next year.
IMMIGRANTS - San Jose’s Vietnamese community struggles with its political voice
7/9/21 In a city with the largest Vietnamese population in the nation, Vietnamese Americans are still struggling to find their voices in politics. The lack—and loss—of Vietnamese representation in San Jose politics is the result of a number of factors, community leaders say, including an inherited distrust in politics and a generational and ideological division in the community.
LEGAL - New DACA Court Ruling
7/16/21 Update from the National Immigration Law Center - A U.S. district court in Texas today agreed with a group of states, led by Texas, that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is unlawful. The court ruled that DACA is unlawful and blocked the federal government from granting any new first-time DACA applications. However, the court will continue to allow DACA renewals. People with DACA will not lose their protections. For the time being, pending renewal applications will be adjudicated and current DACA recipients can continue to submit renewal applications. Key Words: NILC
LEGAL - Supreme Court Denies Bond Hearings to People Pursuing Protection Claims Who Have Prior Removal Orders
6/30/21 The Supreme Court issued a decision on June 29 in the Johnson v. Guzman Chavez case. The majority of the justices determined that people with prior removal orders are subject to mandatory detention, even while they pursue proceedings to stop their deportation to a country where they established they have a reasonable fear of persecution or torture. Without the opportunity to be released on bond, these individuals face months and even years in detention as they pursue protection in what are known as withholding-only proceedings. Withholding of removal is a form of protection that prohibits the U.S. government from deporting someone to a country where they will be persecuted or tortured.
LEGAL - USCIS Announces Return to Deference Policy
4/28/21 Deference is back! USCIS announced that, effective immediately, it will reinstate its 2004 policy of deferring to prior determinations of eligibility. Rescinded by the Trump administration, this policy directed officers to “generally defer to prior determinations of eligibility when adjudicating petition extensions involving the same parties and facts as the initial petition.” This means that prior determinations made by USCIS will receive deference unless “there was a material error, material change in circumstances or in eligibility, or new material information” that would have an adverse impact on eligibility.
NEWS - As laws tackle anti-Asian attacks, advocates push focus to the hate behind the crime
6/13/21 Rather than wait for new crimes against Asian Americans, community leaders push for more actions and policies to address root causes of racial animus As anti-Asian assaults and harassment continue to surge across the country, community leaders are trying to redirect the unprecedented political and legislative attention on hate crimes against Asian Americans toward policies aimed at addressing the underlying racism fueling these attacks.
NEWS - Biden Will Admit Asylum Seekers Ordered Deported Under Trump’s Migrant Protection Protocols
6/23/21 Asylum seekers who were ordered deported for missing their U.S. court hearings under the Trump administration’s so-called Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP)—informally known as the “Remain in Mexico” program—will be allowed to restart their proceedings in the United States. Thousands of others whose cases were terminated because of procedural errors before they had a chance to seek asylum will also be allowed to restart the process.
NEWS - COVID economy: California unemployment claims backlog worsens
6/21/21 California workers are facing a steadily worsening backlog for their unemployment claims, a reminder that the impact of the economic infection that the coronavirus has unleashed has yet to fully abate. For well over a year, California workers have complained about an ineffective and unresponsive state Employment Development Department, an embattled government agency that has struggled to pay people the unemployment benefits they’re owed in a timely and efficient manner.
NEWS - Front-line workers weren’t protected during the Pacific Northwest heat wave
7/14/21 Extreme heat in June caused severe problems for marginalized workers. Bold changes are needed to improve safety. Key Words: Undocumented, Employment Rights, KYR
NEWS - Overwhelming majority of California’s Asian Americans fear physical violence, poll says
5/7/21 In the wake of a rash of alarming hate crimes nationwide, more Californians are acknowledging that Asian Americans experience discrimination, and an overwhelming majority of Asian Americans report that they fear becoming victims of hate-based violence, a new survey says. The California Community Poll, which surveys Californians about politics, race and current events in conjunction with the Los Angeles Times, found that 70% of Californians agree that Asians are “frequently or sometimes” discriminated against.
NEWS - SJ Japantown Foot Patrol Aims to Halt Anti-Asian Crimes Trend
5/5/21 The patrols come amid an apparent rise in crimes against Asian American residents across the U.S. At least two elderly Asian men were killed this year in the Bay Area by strangers on the street. In the tunnel beneath Diridon Station in San Jose, a man attacked a woman, yelling “F*ck you, Asians” as she screamed. Japantown residents have stepped up to protect seniors and businesses from violence and petty crimes. Last month, retired San Jose police officer Rich Saito created Japantown Prepared, an informal group of volunteers who don red vests and walk the neighborhood’s busiest boulevards, including Empire, Jackson and Taylor streets.
NEWS - Since 9/11, US Muslims Have Gained Unprecedented Political, Cultural Influence
8/1/21 As the 20th anniversary of September 11 approaches, the recent rise of many Muslim Americans to positions of power and influence—in Washington and in statehouses, on big screens and small ones, across playing fields and news desks—is a development that few in the U.S. would have predicted two decades ago, Muslims included. In the immediate aftermath of the terrorist attacks by the radical Islamic sect Al-Qaeda, anti-Muslim hate crimes exploded and the ensuing global "war on terror" to root out jihadists created a "climate of discrimination, fear and intolerance," as one think tank described it, that surrounded people.
NEWS - What to do if you lost your Vaccine Card
5/24/21 With California quickly reopening, and businesses increasingly requiring proof of vaccines from employees and customers, it’s time to remember where you stashed your precious COVID-19 vaccination card. It could soon become like a second ticket required for sporting events, international travel and a return to some semblance of normalcy. So what happens if you lost it — or the dog ate it — or maybe you never got a card in the first place? Here’s what you need to know about how to get a new vaccine card, where to store it and more.
NEWS - Young children will pay the price if enough US adults don’t get vaccinated, says expert
7/15/21 Children will likely pay the price for adults in the US not getting vaccinated at high enough rates to slow or stop the spread of Covid-19, which has been surging in most states, a vaccine expert said. If vaccination rates among adults and kids 12 and older keep lagging amid increased spread of the Delta variant, the youngest members of the population will be most affected, said Dr. Peter Hotez, a vaccinologist and dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine.
NEWS- The Rising Tide of Violence and Discrimination Against Asian American and Pacific Islander Women and Girls
6/1/21 Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women and girls are prime targets of hate and discrimination against the AAPI community. The recent shootings across several Atlanta spas that claimed the lives of eight people, including six Asian American women, came on the heels of a staggering increase in hate incidents targeting the AAPI community. Key Words: Hate Crimes, Chinese
RESOURCE - FEMA COVID-19 Funeral Assistance
FEMA is providing financial assistance for COVID-19 related funeral expenses incurred after January 20, 2020. The death must have occurred in the US, including the US territories, and the District of Columbia. The death certificate must indicate the death was attributed to COVID-19. The applicant must be a US citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien who incurred funeral expenses after 1/20/20. There is no requirement for the deceased person to have been a US citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien. FEMA Funeral Application Video ***COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Line Number 844-684-6333 | TTY: 800-462-7585 *** FAQ Key Words: Pandemic Multi-language: Spanish | Chinese | Vietnamese | Portuguese | Creole |
RESOURCE - Free WiFi Hotspots for Low Income SJ Families
6/25/21 CreaTV is working to bridge the digital divide and we've got you connected! If you or anyone in your household is under the age of 24 and needs a stable internet connection or has challenges with speeds or data caps, Wifi hotspots are available for a year at no charge to low-income households in San José. We are here to help you stay on top of all your virtual activities and summer learning goals. For more information and to see if you qualify please call (408) 200-2421 or email community@creatvsj.org
RESOURCE - Hollaback! Anti-Harrassment Training and Tool Kits
Hollaback! is a global, people-powered movement to end harassment — in all its forms. We believe that we all deserve to be who we are, wherever we are. We believe we all have a role to play in disrupting harassment and building a culture where it is no longer seen as “just the price you have to pay” for being a woman, LGBTQ+, a person of color, or any other marginalized identity. We teach people to take action, and to reach across their own identities to ally with others and establish a united front against harassment each time we witness it. Key Words: Free Bystander Intervention Intervention Training, Hate Crime
SCC OIR Newsletter - July 2021 - Immigration Updates
7/21 Updates from the Santa Clara County Office of Immigrant Relations on USCIS policies on Public Charge, DACA, U-Visas, and Prosecutorial Discretion.
SCC OIR Newsletter - June 2021
This month we celebrate our LGBTQ+ community by recognizing trailblazers that have fought for our rights to exist fully and authentically and we uplift Immigrant Heritage Month as we acknowledge the contributions of our essential workers, contributions to our economy ,and honor the sacrifices made for a better life! We continue to fight against anti-Asian hate and push for more immigration relief efforts. Additionally, we reflect on the long history of Juneteenth, celebrated on June 19th in remembrance of the day all people living in the United States, including formerly enslaved, were granted freedom. This year, President Biden signed a bill acknowledging Juneteenth as a national holiday.
HEALTH - COVID-19 Etiquette: 6 Common Conundrums (And A Printable Pocket Guide)
Tips on how to keep yourself safe and politely interact with people regarding following Pandemic health guidelines. Print out A Pocket Guide to COVID-19 Etiquette With Elaine Swann.
MENTAL HEALTH - Solidarity in Isolation? Social Cohesion at a Time of Physical Distance
7/21 Report from Migration Policy - In addition to its widespread public-health and economic impacts, the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged social cohesion in many countries by forcing changes in how people interact. Physical connection, the most human response to collective adversity, has been largely out of reach during long periods of lockdown, social distancing, and remote work and learning. The temporary closure of public spaces such as libraries and schools has also limited the spontaneous, casual encounters that can build bridges between disparate groups.
NEWS - California’s reopening plan includes no equity benchmarks for hard-hit communities
4/11/21 California began a 10-week countdown to a full reopening last week, with Gov. Gavin Newsom’s bold proposal to lift nearly all coronavirus restrictions by June 15. But the ambitious plan contains no specific protections for vulnerable populations, sparking fears the state is about to repeat mistakes that devastated the Latino community last year. The omission was surprising, considering that Newsom’s announcement was triggered by the delivery of 4 million vaccine doses to disadvantaged neighborhoods, a key goal that the state had set to address inequalities in the state’s inoculation efforts. In recent weeks, Newsom and other state officials have referred to equity as the “north star” of the pandemic response.
NEWS - Fake news: Recognizing and stemming misinformation
9/17 Fake news is information that is fabricated (made up) and packaged to appear as fact. Unlike satire or other forms of humor, fake news attempts to deliberately mislead or deceive its audience, often with the goal of financial, political or other type of gain. Fake news often uses attention-grabbing headlines to draw as large an audience as possible. Being able to evaluate the accuracy of what you read or hear, and refraining from spreading false stories, will help you and others avoid the repercussions of fake news. Spanish
NEWS - Statement by United Nations High Commissioner of Human Rights
4/21/21 Discrimination in the Americas - Challenges and good practices - This past year has changed our lives in ways we still struggle to understand. But in the midst of so many uncertainties, one thing comes clear: rarely have we seen such a powerful demonstration of the value of human rights. COVID-19 and its impacts have been feeding off and exacerbating gaps in human rights protection; fault lines built on profound, intersecting and structural discrimination and inequalities. The pandemic took the whole world by storm, but the tempest hit hardest in the Americas.
VOTING - SCC Registrar of Voters
Register to vote, check your voting registration, learn about eligibility, find your polling place and election results. Key Word: Santa Clara County, Election, Multi-lingual: | Chinese | Spanish | Tagalog| Vietnamese| Registrar of Voters, County of Santa Clara Local Voter Rights Act Information | Voter Rights Act Toolkit to assist community partners in engaging communities around voter rights.
NEWS - Violence and hate against Asian Americans is a health and safety crisis for everyone
3/17/21 Public outings carry extra danger for Asian people, with a spate of recent attacks targeted against Asian elders that have resulted in racial trauma, injury, and death. Asian elders are perceived as vulnerable. Volunteer escorts, private guards and air horns aren't enough. We need government support and commitment. Key Words: Hate Crime, AAPI
HEALTH - New Stanford research: Why Zoom can wipe you out
2/23/21 COVID-19 pandemic has moved our lives into a virtual space. Why is that so exhausting? The tiredness doesn’t feel earned. We’re not flying an airplane, teaching toddlers or rescuing people trapped in burning buildings. Still, by the end of the day, the feeling is so universal that it has its own name: Zoom Fatigue. Stanford researchers find four causes for ‘Zoom fatigue’ and propose simple fixes
RESEARCH - 2021 Cyberhate - Online Hate and Harrassment.pdf
According to the latest results from ADL’s annual survey of hate and harassment on social media, despite the seeming blitz of self-regulation from technology companies, the level of online hate and harassment reported by users barely shifted when compared to reports from a year ago. This is the third consecutive year ADL has conducted its nationally representative survey. Forty-one percent of Americans said they had experienced online harassment over the past year, comparable to the 44% reported in last year’s “Online Hate and Harassment” report. Severe online harassment comprising sexual harassment, stalking, physical threats, swatting, doxing and sustained harassment also remained relatively constant compared to the prior year, experienced by 27% of respondents, not a significant change from the 28% reported in the previous survey.